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What is Home Health Care?

Home Health Care FAQs

What can I expect on the first home health care visit?

On the first visit, a nurse or therapist will conduct an initial evaluation. At Hands of Hope Home Health, this thorough interview and evaluation is part of our coordinated approach to managing your overall health status. Our evaluation focuses on educating you in self-care management and partners with your doctor to promote disease prevention and proactive care – which includes the family or caregivers.

This team approach facilitates an easier transition for you from a hospital or nursing facility to your home, and actively engages you and your caregivers in your health care.

Will Hands of Hope create a care plan just for me or my loved one?

Yes. After your doctor refers you to Hands of Hope Home Health Care, a clinician will come to your home to assess your needs. We will communicate with your doctor to discuss the assessment and work together to develop your personal plan of care. Hands of Hope Home Health Care staff will implement your physician-ordered plan of care and keep your doctor updated about your progress. If your condition or needs change, we’ll collaborate with your doctor to review your plan of care and make any adjustments deemed necessary.

How often will my home health care visits be?

The frequency of home health care visits and the services provided are based on your doctor’s orders in your personal plan of care. Your doctor may change your plan of care, increasing or decreasing the number of visits or services provided, in order to provide you with the best home health care for your needs.

My doctor is ordering home health care for me; can I request Hands of Hope by name?

Absolutely, and we’d be honored to care for you or your loved one. Federal law gives patients the freedom to choose their health care provider under Medicare.

Who is eligible for home health care?

There are several requirements for receiving home health care:

  • You must have a doctor prescribe home health care.
  • You must need either skilled nursing care on an intermittent basis or therapy services (i.e., physical/occupational/speech therapy)
  • You must be restricted in your ability to leave home (“homebound”), and your homebound status must be certified by a physician.
This means that you require the help or supervision of another person, or you use a supportive device such as a cane or walker. You can leave the home as often as you need for medical treatment. You are allowed brief and infrequent absences from the home for some non-medical reasons, such as an occasional trip to the barber/beauty shop or a walk around the block.
What does “homebound status” mean?

Essentially, your condition should be such that there exists a normal inability to leave home and doing so would require considerable and taxing effort. Generally speaking, you would be considered homebound if you have a condition due to an illness or injury that restricts your ability to leave home without the aid of an assistive device (such as crutches, canes, walkers or wheelchairs), without the assistance of another person, or if leaving the home is medically inadvisable.

You can leave the home as often as you need for medical treatment that cannot be provided in the home. Further, you are allowed brief and infrequent absences from the home for some non-medical reasons, such as an occasional trip to the barber/beauty shop, to attend church, or for unique family events (like a graduation).

Who pays for home health care services?

If you meet certain eligibility requirements, Medicare may pay for your covered home health care for as long as you’re eligible and your doctor certifies that you need it.

Additionally, your state’s Medicaid program or your private insurance also may cover home health care, or some services that Medicare doesn’t cover.

What qualifies as a “home” when home health care is being considered?

A patient’s residence is wherever she makes her home. This may be her house, an apartment, a relative’s home, a home for the aged, or some other type of institution. However, a hospital, skilled nursing facility (SNF) or intermediate care facility (ICF) is not considered the patient’s home.

What’s the difference between home care, home health care and hospice care?

Home-care agencies perform household and personal care services, like preparing meals, cleaning, and helping with bathing or dressing.

Home health care provides medical treatment for an illness or injury, with the goal of helping you recover, regain your independence and become as self-sufficient as possible. Home health care can also help you live with a chronic condition, like heart disease, COPD, or diabetes. Additionally, home health care can include some personal care services, like help bathing and dressing, as part of the plan of care ordered by your doctor.

Hospice care is designed to provide non-curative treatment and comfort for those who are facing a life-limiting illness. It offers a support system of medical, social, psychological, and spiritual services that support a patient, their family, and other loved ones.

Home health care provides medical treatment for an illness or injury, with the goal of helping you recover, regain your independence and become as self-sufficient as possible. More than just providing excellent care in your home, home health care also saves billions of dollars each year. There is no more cost-effective provider of health care in our country.

Hands of Hope Home Health Care offers health care services such as skilled nursing, home health aides, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. We can also offer specialized chronic care programs that focus on actively involving you in your health care process, addressing conditions including:

WE PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING HOME HEALTH SERVICES:

  • Home Health Aides for bathing and personal care
  • Heart disease
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Infusion therapy
  • Oncology
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Peripheral IV Insertion/maintenance
  • PICC, Port-A-Cath and Broviac line care
  • IV Antibiotic - IM Antibiotics, TPN/Lipids
  • IV Hydration - for dehydration and Hyperemesis Gravidarum patients
  • Ostomy care
  • Medication management
  • Post-operative care
  • Orthopedic - total knee and hip replacements
  • Wound care including post-operative wounds, decubitus and post-skin grafting procedures
  • Pain management including but not limited to medications, sub-cutaneious pain pumps and IV pain pums and monitoring
  • Urinary and supra-pubic cath care - routine catheter changes and monitoring/teaching to prevent urinary tract infection
  • Laboratory draw
  • Diabetic teaching - insulin pump management

CERTIFIED NURSE'S ASSISTANTS:
  • Bathing and grooming assistance
  • Dressing assistance and meal preparation
  • Light housekeeping
  • Covered by medicare, medicaid and most private insurance plans
  • All care is coordinated with your personal physician

PHYSICAL THERAPY:
  • Strengthening exercises
  • Balance training
  • Post-surgery rehabilitation

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY:
  • Post-stroke rehabilitation
  • Training for improved home safety
  • Exercises to promote independence

SPEECH THERAPY:
  • Speech training
  • Swallowing exercises
  • Cognitive rehabilitation
 

 






 
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